About your Search

20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3
than expected in the wake of hurricane sandy and fiscal cliff anxiety. >> so it looks like sandy will not affect the numbers even after revisions. >> reporter: georgetown's harry holzer, former chief economist for the labor department. >> in terms of the fiscal cliff, so far we are not seeing any big impact. >> reporter: not even an impact on retail which, for all the talk of online supplanting bricks-and-mortar buying, added 53,000 jobs last month-- much of it holiday hiring, no doubt-- but a healthy 140,000 overall increase in the past three months. not all the new numbers were festive, however. construction shed 20,000 jobs, though perhaps influenced by sandy. manufacturing dropped 7,000. grinchier still, job growth in september and october was revised down by 49,000 jobs. and for all the talk of a lower unemployment rate, its explanation seemed to be that several hundred thousand more americans stopped looking for work in november and were counted out of the labor force. again, economist holtzer. >> this month's change was driven completely by the fact some people stopped loo
and recently sandy. each storm brought a grim reminder of yet one more ever-present disaster: the deadly cholera epidemic that started ten months after the quake. at the cholera ward of saint luke's hospital just outside the capital port-au-prin, this doctor says since hurricane sandy admissions have doubled from 20 to 40 patients each day. >> most of the new cases are coming from further up the hill in places where we had not seen them before. i'm not positive but perhaps the wells there have been contaminated. >> reporter: experts believe cholera was brought here by u.n. peacekeepers. untreated sewage from this base flowed into a tributary of the river, the major source of water foroth washing and drinking. cholera is spread by fecal-oral contact. two years on 200,000 patients have been sickened, 750 d 7,500 have died from diarrhea and fluid loss. each flood brings more contaminated water, more cases. the epidemic prompted massive relief efforts and public campaigns. on the streets and in classrooms promoting hygiene and sanitation. fatalities have dropped from 10% of cases early on to
by the architect of this model, sandy wiel, saying we should break up the big banks. gwen, i think it tells us more about the end of the era of kind of this force conglomeration of bank where's bigger is naturally better. you have seen, obviously, too big to fail banks become too bigger to fail, such as j.p.morgan, or wells fargo which bought wachovia. but there are others who find they can't hit their stride with the asset they say accummed a decade ago. >> ifill: what we're watching happening at citigroup. does that make them an outlier or a sign of things to come? >> i think it's a little bit of both. citigroup, let's not forget, had to go in for two rounds of bailout money. there was even scuttlebut that the white house suggested this was a bank that should fail, that it was beyond rescue. it still has $1 fent billion of bad seeftz its sheets it's looking to get rid of. there are no easy answers for it. there is no overnight turnaround. and at the same time, it's a public company and shareholders are saying, "show me the progress." >> ifill: roben farzhad of "bloomberg business week," thank you
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)